Welcome to the Wonderful World of... Mike Patton


 
AccueilFAQRechercherS'enregistrerMembresGroupesConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 Interviews

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Suivant
AuteurMessage
xspirit
Firecracker
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2128
Age : 109
Localisation : Riorges. capitale de la scie musicale...
Date d'inscription : 05/04/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Ven 3 Mar 2006 - 13:59

Marrante cette interview...Merci
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.sciemusicale.fr
Shinji
Administrateur
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1950
Age : 42
Localisation : Conflans (78)
Date d'inscription : 24/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Ven 3 Mar 2006 - 14:41

Merci Flichtenbloden !
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.salival.fr
|BRAM|
Johnny Hallyday
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1770
Localisation : Tokyo
Date d'inscription : 23/06/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Ven 3 Mar 2006 - 15:22

Intéressent le moment où il picole à Buffalo, qu'il insulte tout le monde et qu'il se met à poil. Laughing
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.francobelgedesign.com
Tatann
Firecracker
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1257
Localisation : Bretagne
Date d'inscription : 07/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Ven 3 Mar 2006 - 16:44

thumright cheers
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://anselmo.fr.st
Mr Grabuge
Peeping Tom
avatar

Nombre de messages : 862
Localisation : Paris
Date d'inscription : 15/07/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Sam 4 Mar 2006 - 6:01

xspiritmental a écrit:
TS: Can we expect a Fantomas or Melvins DVD in the future?
MP: I'm sure eventually, but nothing planned right now although Isis are working on one for us and we will release a DVD of animations created by the artist Dalek.
J'avais pas fait gaffe à ça!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
xspirit
Firecracker
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2128
Age : 109
Localisation : Riorges. capitale de la scie musicale...
Date d'inscription : 05/04/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Dim 2 Avr 2006 - 21:48

http://tensticks.com/content/patton1_interview.htm
http://tensticks.com/content/patton2_interview.htm


Our first interview will be with none other thatn Mike Patton. Mike Patton is the vocalist for Tomahawk, Fantomas,Peeping Tom, and countless other projects. He also just appeared in Steven Balderson's masterpiece "Firecracker" [dikenga.com for more info on the film.] He is also co-owner of Ipecac Recordings. So here is your 20 questions from the mind of Mike Patton.
TS: What's it like scoring your first film?
MP: Very slow! It's not easy that's for sure. The film directs the music. I am used to creating music without direction. I like the challenge.
TS: What does Peeping Tom sound like?
MP: I'm terrible at this. It sounds kind of trip hoppish and mordern poppish to me.
__________________________

TS: What did you think of the latest Star Wars movie?
MP: Not so hot. The romance was really cheezy. The last Batman was great though, especially in IMAX.
TS: Have you played the new Star Wars Battlefront game?
MP: Nah. Not into the Star Wars games. I'll stick with NBA and Grand Theft.
TS: When writing music what instrument comes first in the creative process?
MP: It varies.
TS: What kind of guitar do you prefer?
MP: No preference. Loud?
TS: Do you ever feel overwhelmed by all of the projects you take on?
MP: Nope. Variety is the spice of life. Some of the fans of my stuff do, but I don't. TS: What's your involvement with the videogame Bully?
MP: Nothing, I'm not involved.
TS: Can we expect a Fantomas or Melvins DVD in the future?
MP: I'm sure eventually, but nothing planned right now although Isis are owrking on one for us and we will release a DVD of animations created by the artist Dalek.
TS: Do you have a theme for the next Fantomas record?
MP: Nope. That's a long time away.
TS: Are you making any guests appearences anytime soon?
MP: I'm playing with John Zorn in NYC on New Year's Eve and doing a couple of shows with Rahzel in Brooklyn on Dec. 28 & 29. Just did a track for the next DUB Trio record.


___________________________

TS: Would it piss you off to know that I have had a respirator microphone built?
MP: Why would that piss me off? Good on ya mate!
TS: Better band, Butthole Surfers or Ween?
MP: Tough question, because both bands evolve, but I would have to stick with my friends, Ween.
TS: Mike thank you so much for your time it has been an honor. If it wasn't for you and your label I wouldn't have anything to listen to.
MP: Oh come on, there is a lot out there, you just have to dig. But thanks! TS: Do you write daily?
MP: No. I hate writing.
TS: What's a more powerful force in music, emotion or imagination?
MP: Imagination. At least it should be.
TS: Will the next Tomahawk album be left of center?
MP: Oh yeah. Kind of has a native american feel.
TS: Any music recommendations?
MP: Mugison and Messer Chups.
TS: I've always been a fan of your musical toys and effects. Have you found anything new or have a favorite?
MP: No, not that I can think of.
TS: Do you use Pro Tools?
MP: I'm trying to learn it, yes.
TS: What's the last good movie you watched?
MP: Capote.
___________________________
This is me, TenSticks signing off......

TS: Besides Peeping Tom, Tomahawk, and your guest
appearances what's your next musical endeavor?
MP: Geez. Not sure. I've got another Peeping Tom I'm working on and a collaboration with Eyvind Kang. There is talk of another Lovage and doing a recording with Rahzel. I'm working on a couple Indie film scores.
TS: Tell us more about the show in (Modena) Italy. Will it be recorded and/or released?
MP: Nothing official on that. Don't think so.
TS: How is the Tomahawk album going? Have you titled
the album?
MP: Going slow. About half way through the trading tapes phase. Still a lot to do. Not even close to having a
title.

__________________________

MP: Hmmm. That is tough. Just based on the name I'd say Death Cab For Cutie, but I've never heard their music.
TS: Did you have an opportunity to watch Firecracker on the big screen?
MP: Yes. Did you?
TS: Do you have a favorite director?
MP: Danny Devito.
TS: How involved are you with your albums artwork?
MP: Very, extremely..... too involved!!!!
TS: Which of the Fantomas albums have sold the most?
MP: Boys count em, men drink em.
TS: Any plans to work with Kaada?
MP: It would be nice. He is a VERY talented artist.
TS: What kind of touring can we expect from Peeping Tom?
MP: Hopefully some interesting opening slots or theater shows in the Fall.
TS: How many Peeping Tom albums will there be out of the material you've got now?
MP: Probably 3.
TS: Have you taken anymore acting gigs?
MP: Nope, but did the voice of the title character in a
big videogame for the PS3 called "The Darkness".
TS: Is the Pinion soundtrack going to be released?
MP: I don't think so.
TS: What kind of sampling software do you use? How do
you trigger the samples live?
MP: Man, you think I'm going to give you my secrets??? I use Norton Anti Virus.
TS: Any Ipecac news you would like to share with us?
__________________________

TS: Okay Mike, lets start a few Internet rumors. What are a few musical ideas/projects that you would like to do, but will most likely never see the light of day?
MP: I'd like to be the singer for INXS. Is that job
still open? I'd like to play a part in the next Grand
Theft Auto game.
TS: How do you feel about the Lakers?
MP: I'm surprised they are doing as well as they are.
Phil and Kobe alone is still better than half the
teams in the NBA. Should be an active off season.
MP: We are damn busy! Keep an eye on www.ipecac.com for the straight skinny.
TS: Will the upcoming Fantomas big band be released on DVD/CD?
MP: No .
TS: Do you ever suffer from writers block?
MP: Lyrically, yes. Musically, never.
TS: What does it take for a band to get signed on Ipecac?
MP: Got to be real good looking. Have you seen the guys in Venomous Concept? To be honest we not only have 2006 filled up but we almost have 2007 complete as well. So unless your name is Sigur Ros or Willie Nelson we don't have any room for you.
TS: What's the worst band you've heard lately?
___________________________
TS: Thanks again for taking time to answer our questions. It's always a pleasure and we here at Tensticks hope and pray you will never retire...May the force be with you and your Lakers General P..
MP: Retire???? I'm just getting started. Thanks!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.sciemusicale.fr
xspirit
Firecracker
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2128
Age : 109
Localisation : Riorges. capitale de la scie musicale...
Date d'inscription : 05/04/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Lun 24 Avr 2006 - 19:04

Citation :
yes man, you can use the interview on your website ...
just one thing....
put link of our website or a banner
T'as reçu le message shinji ? Si tu veux agrémenter ton site , c'est cadeau...

here the interview

Citation :
1.When did you first realize the potential of your voice?

* I guess when i was 8 or 9. I did things to get
attention at the orphanage.


2.Did you have any teacher at the beginning? Did you take singing lessons or studied solfeggio and such stuff?

* Never.


5.Did your parents or friends realized your talent?
And who gave you the gratest support ( apart from Trevor)?

* The Lord our savior helped me. Most people still don't know that I'm talented. Trevor keeps trying to get me to retire or let him sing.



7.Apart from being a young metalhead ( or merdallaro, as you prefer! ), what other kinds of music did you use to listen to before joining Faith No More? And, as an example, how did you discover Demetrio Stratos and Area? And, furthermore, have you always been listening to almost everything, or have you been enlarging your musical horizons through the years?

* Before FNM I was mainly into metal and videogame
music. I became aware of other interesting music as I
travelled the world. I'm always looking for new stuff.


8.Have you ever watched Stratos' documentary on his technique? Do you use any of his exercises? Can you make a second or third sound? We know you were going to take part in an event in Demetrios Stratos' honour in Vicenza ( Italy ).are you still going to? Maybe playing together with the remaining members of Area. By the way, are there any italian artist you would like to sing with?.Mina?

* I have not seen the documentary. I can make some
interesting sounds. Most of the Italian artists that I
really admire are dead. But I really like Zu and
Corleone and others.


9.What do you exactly think about italian prog, or prog in general? Has it ever crossed your mind the idea of taking part in such a project? Maybe a collaboration with Cedric from Mars Volta, or John di Leo ( ex-Quintorigo ) or Balletto di bronzo.

* Prog does not do it for me. I don't enjoy mindless
noodling and I don't smoke pot. I have enough projects
right now!


10.Even though electronic is without any doubt extremely useful, we prefer a great lot having a musician, a person who plays an instrument.take William Winant in Mr. Bungle as an example.

* You like Willie?????


With the Peeing Tom project how do you think you will go live, on stage, if you will ever do it?! By the way, are there any news about the release of the cd? It's great stuff!!!

* It will be a full band. Hopefully touring by Fall.
The record comes out end of May. We just shot a music
video.


11.With Mr. Bungle you used videogames samples.
Which were you favourite videogame when you wereyounger? Did you use to play with pc or with consoles? Do you know Monkey Island? .which videogames do you play with now?!

* I hate PC games only consoles. I just got a PSP that
I love. I used to play Sonic and RBI Baseball. My
favorites now are NBA Live and the Grand Theft Auto
games. I did the voice of the title character in an
upcoming PS3 game called "The Darkness".


12.You have a little golden horn around your neck...superstition? Have you any peculiar feeling with black cats, or is it still superstition?
We are thinking about "Falling to pieces" videoclip or your liveshows with Mr.Bungle, as you used to put a black cat puppet upon the stage.

* I have some superstitions, but would prefer not totalk about them.

13....

*


14.When did you first come to Italy?

* I have never been, but heard it is nice.


15.Who was the one who taught you Italian bestly, ormostly?

* Maybe you? Bestly?????


16.Tell us what you DON'T like about Italy!

* I love it all!!!!


17.Which italian bands do you like? What do you think about Zu, with whom you play in Perugia and even in Japan? Are you going to do something with them? .by the way: what are you listening to lately, and what would you suggest to us?

* Yes, I really like Zu. Lately I'm listening to tapes
of new Tomahawk music. I suggest you listen to what
your momma says and everything on Ipecac.


18.In a previous interview, talking about Fantômas, you said something about a possible videoclip in Italy, where you drive an ape, running through the streets, with the rest of the band on the back, playing. Are you still thinking about it?! If you need public or extras.here we are! It would be great!!!

* We are almost done with it, but we need your help
for sure. Call me!!!


19.Is it annoying for you that some fans of yours film your concerts? If it is NOT for business purposes, we find great ( considering nowadays technology ) to have the chance of having a video so easily, and with such a great quality. As there are no official video or dvd this is the only way to appreciate Fantômas music as it sounds in live performances, which is an important aspect of a band. What do you think about it? Are you against or pro bootleg-exchange?

* Trading is great! Selling is bullshit!


20.What did Adam Jones do in Fantômas cds?!

* He plays glockenspiel and wrote the lyrics on
"Suspended Animation".


21.We think that it was no easy for you the substitution of Lombardo with Bozzio. and, in fact, you were behaving quite differently on stage, maybe you were even a bit nervous, isn't it? What was that let you choose Bozzio? There are rumors about a possible project with him.should Lombardo feel "at risk" now?!

* We are all at risk! Bozzio is a great drummer, very
different than Dave but very good. Dave is the
Fantômas drummer.


22.Talking about artworks ( marvellous!!! ), how did start your collaboration with Kvamme? To what extent do you take part in his work? And how do you two come to the final product?

* Met him at a show in Norway years ago. I really like his stuff and he is a real pro! We trade ideas formonths. We put a lot of work into these packages.


23.Do you personally choose the bands to which you offer a contract? Do you listen to all the demos you receive? Who listen to them? Which is the most original stuff Ipecac received?

* My partner Greg and I choose the bands. We do not listen to many demos. It would take up too much time. We hear about bands from our friends and other bands on the label. We receive some pretty good stuff, but a lot sounds like other bands on the label or bands that I have been in.


24.What does your electronic instrumentation (hardware, software, plugin, custom instrument ) consist of? And how do you use M-audio Ozone?

* Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz


25.How do you think of the sounds you sing? I mean:when you first sang "purumpuppà", did it have a precise meaning for you?! Or were you following some strange rule of composition? Or did you have a sound in mind and then you tried to make it with your own voice? or is it your mechanic who invents them for you?!

* The voice is an instrument. No rules, just part of
the music.


26.Apart from music, are there any arts you explore so deeply or you feel deeply involved with? What you read and watch does influence you musically? If so,to what extent?

* I like reading and movies as well as videogames.
Everything in life influences me. Especially food.
Everything but interviews!!!!
HA!!!!

best,
MP



at the end write:

this interview is propriety of the Delìrium Fantômas Italian FanClub



then put a banner or put a weblink
website:
http://www.deliriumfantomas.it

and Messages Board (Forum):
http://www.forumfree.net/?c=32558


the banner can be:


linked to the forum


and:



linked to http://www.deliriumfantomas.it
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.sciemusicale.fr
Mr Grabuge
Peeping Tom
avatar

Nombre de messages : 862
Localisation : Paris
Date d'inscription : 15/07/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Mar 25 Avr 2006 - 0:54

Mike Patton a écrit:
Trading is great! Selling is bullshit!

Faites péter Peeping Tom!!!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Ozma
Peeping Tom
avatar

Nombre de messages : 753
Age : 32
Localisation : Lille
Date d'inscription : 04/03/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Mar 25 Avr 2006 - 2:43

putain je me suis bien marré quand même parfois, comme le coup de

"tu écoutes quoi en ce moment ? et qu'est ce que tu nous conseilles d'écouter ?
_Je te conseille d'écouter ta mère et aussi tout ce qu'Ipecac sort"

Mr. Green
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.melvinsfrance.tk
xspirit
Firecracker
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2128
Age : 109
Localisation : Riorges. capitale de la scie musicale...
Date d'inscription : 05/04/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Ven 19 Mai 2006 - 17:49

It's an article more than an interview: Smile
ils se sont juste plantés sur la photo de MP

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/news/upcoming_releases/faith_no_mores_mike_patton_rocks_on_with_new_project_peeping_tom.html?200605180344


Dernière édition par le Ven 19 Mai 2006 - 20:05, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.sciemusicale.fr
Diabolik
Firecracker
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2747
Localisation : Dans le cul du chat...
Date d'inscription : 25/02/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Ven 19 Mai 2006 - 18:13

Shocked Rha les loosers... se planter sur une photo entre Mike et Kaada... les fans vont les crucifier!!! Twisted Evil
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Tatann
Firecracker
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1257
Localisation : Bretagne
Date d'inscription : 07/09/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Ven 19 Mai 2006 - 18:34

ça y est, chuis déjà en train de pirater le site pour corriger cet affront Razz
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://anselmo.fr.st
|BRAM|
Johnny Hallyday
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1770
Localisation : Tokyo
Date d'inscription : 23/06/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Mar 30 Mai 2006 - 11:07



Interview fleuve très très intéressente trouvé par CV.org
On y apprend une tonne de petits détails sur la production de Peeping Tom, ses nouveaux projets, les coeurs en Italie, que Patton a failli perdre la sensibilité de sa main, on y parle de Firecracker, de Pinion, bref, tout tout tout!

Citation :
Years ago I was interviewed and one of their questions was whether there was anyone I really wanted to interview that I hadn’t yet. Most of the people I named I have talked such as Frank Miller, James O'Barr and Darren Aronofsky. Time to check off another one with someone I’ve wanted to talk to for 15 years, Mike Patton. Like most Patton fans I first discovered his work when he was with Faith No More. Later I was introduced to the first Mr. Bungle album and the mid to late 90’s was Patton heaven with his avante garde solo albums and the introduction of the bands Tomahawk and Fantomas.

Patton’s latest project is the first Peeping Tom album which is coming out through his Ipecac Recordings. The new album is mostly Patton with regular collaborators Dan the Automator, Rahzel and Massive Attack alongside new personages Norah Jones and Kool Keith.

Buy Peeping Tom

Daniel Robert Epstein: Your press notes say that you think the new Peeping Tom album is more accessible.

Mike Patton: Basically I make the damn records and to a certain extent I talk about them after they’re out if people are twisting my arm to. Then whatever goes into the bios is really where I draw the line and give up because, boy, I don’t know what to call this shit or what’s going to look good in print. So I pretty much leave it up to them and I end up having to talk myself out of it sometimes. But who knows? Accessible? I’d agree that it’s easier on the ear. It is more linear music than a lot of other current projects of mine and it’s more song form oriented. What all that adds up to is a huge question mark to me, but I’ll let you guys decide.

DRE: When you first started Peeping Tom it seemed like a project that wasn’t as big in scope as other things you were doing.

Patton: Possibly. It laid around on my desktop for a while. I was working on it in my spare time. But that’s how all my projects get started, there’s no real hierarchy for me. It just depends on if it feels like the season to work on Tomahawk or Fantomas then that’s my main focus and other stuff goes to the back burner. You can only focus on so many things at once. This one unfortunately kept getting brushed aside even though in my mind it was something I felt very compelled to do. But it gathered a little bit of dust.

DRE: Was the fact that Peeping Tom ended up being easier on the ears very organic?

Patton: Yeah, basically the way I write sometimes is that I just sit down at the desk and start writing. It’s the process that I’m in love with and then all of a sudden a lightbulb goes off and it’s done. I knew immediately this stuff wasn’t going to fit with any of the other projects I was doing. Once I had ten or 15 pieces that I thought were really strong, I was like, “Ok, I guess I better do something with this.” Which in my case means start another band, start another project. There’s still some song style adventures left in me and I’ve got to explore them. That’s when I started taking it more seriously and started seeing it on the same level as many of my other projects. After that I was able to make time and focus on it.

DRE: How do you know when one of your songs is finished?

Patton: That’s a tough thing and the best answer is, you just know. [laughs] The older I get the more conscious I’ve gotten of that. I’ve realized that one of my weaknesses as a writer is that whether I’m writing a strange operatic piece or a groove piece or some long form avante garde collage is knowing when to stop. The trick is knowing when to pull the plug. One of my weaknesses is to really over orchestrate and to overdo it. With this project the challenge was to reel in all of this stuff that I’ve learned and experienced over the last few years and cram it into a three minute song that does not stray too far from the path. To make it melodically driven and something that holds your interest and at the same time is not too boring or too linear. For me it was a real delicate balance and quite a challenge to do that.

DRE: Why is a Peeping Tom song a Peeping Tom song and a Tomahawk song a Tomahawk song?

Patton: Each one to me is its own little universe. Each one has its own little set of rules and regulations and parameters. The only way I can make sense of my music is to compartmentalize it as opposed to having one band that I have to throw everything into. For me it’s just more fun and more challenging to create little worlds where a song or a piece can make sense. With Fantomas, for instance, the language that we’ve developed and that I started out with in mind was, “Ok, I’m going to use these things that I grew up with like heavy metal, hardcore riffs, things that we’ve heard before. But I’m going to organize them in a really unfamiliar jarring way. I’m not going to make songs out of them. I’m not going to have lyrics. I’m not going to be a traditional singer. My voice is like a second guitar, so there are the basic rules. You can do a lot within that little box and now we’ve made three, four records; we’ll probably make three or four more.

Once I got on the path with Peeping Tom, I realized, “ok this is what this project is and this is what it’s going to be.” A lot of times you figure it out as you go along just like life. The longer we live the clearer some things become. With Peeping Tom, like I said before, I realized I wanted to keep everything in a fairly linear song format and that automatically eliminates a lot of extracurricular activities. With Tomahawk that’s a whole other beast, that’s a whole other universe. That’s more of a traditional rock band but it all starts with Duane Denison, the guitar player. It’s his baby, he writes the tunes. My role is much different in there. I’m the facilitator so I help him flesh out the tunes and arrange things. Whether I set out to do this or not, each project ends up being its own little world where certain things can happen and other things are impossible.

DRE: The original movie Peeping Tom is one of my favorite films. It’s got this great line, “All this filming. It's not healthy.”

Patton: Yeah, they told me you were a film buff and that you’d know some lines in that movie.

DRE: I love that movie so much [laughs].

Patton: Good man.

DRE: Did you ever think that what you were doing, maybe unhealthy isn’t the right but some people would consider the music unhealthy.

Patton: Well, whatever. There’s a danger in anything that is unfamiliar. That’s the world we live in. People want to be reminded and patted on the back; they want to be told things they already know. We’re constantly being fed images and being told what to like and what is good and for the most part, I think people enjoy living that way. It takes a lot of the thinking out of it. Everywhere you look there’s someone doing your thinking for you and telling you what to think and when to think of it. So even though this Peeping Tom record, to me, sounds fairly linear, in my universe this is pop music, this is groove music, whatever you want to call it. This is my romantic soul music for crying out loud. What that means in the real world is quite beyond me. I realize this is not Kylie Minogue or The Strokes and I realize that everything that I do is always going to be a little bit of a bastard and it’s going to fall through the cracks. But I think that good things have a way of finding the cracks and I believe that it’s our responsibility or at least mine, to find that shit. That’s part of the reason I started a label, to provide a home for some musical misfits and put a roof over our heads.

DRE: Was there much improvisation with this album?

Patton: No, not really. The process of the record was strange. It was actually pretty personal and lonely. It was mostly me. Like I do with a lot of projects, I initially thought I would play the instruments so I can communicate what I want to musicians I play with. I do crude homemade versions and they learn it from there since I don’t write in the traditional sense with notes on paper. That’s how I do it. So I did that like I do with Fantomas and with a lot of other things. I got used to the sloppy, simple nature of the stuff and I realized I wasn’t going to have to hire a band. But one of the main weaknesses was really the programming, which I’m just fucking terrible at it. That’s when I realized “ok, rather than putting a band in a room and trying to recreate this, I’m going to keep these tracks and work with producers, beat makers.” That’s something I’ve never really done. Also maybe an occasional guest, so that’s when I found the path. Since that was what this project was going to be I was going to stick with it no matter how long it takes because the nature of working with 15 different people long distance is one of patience.

DRE: I read that the idea of having Norah Jones on the album came up when you guys were drinking.

Patton: Yeah, that was quite the long shot but I threw a line out and she responded immediately. So I would say I got incredibly lucky. A couple of others like Dan the Automator and Rahzel were security blankets. Anytime I’m starting something new I’ve got to have a couple of known quantities. I knew I’d get results out of them and it might spearhead some other people to become interested in it. Beyond that there were a few acquaintances and a few total strangers. What I do is on a song by song basis is think “ok, this beat or this approach would be best suited for Amon Tobin or Massive Attack, or whoever.” In a lot of cases I was totally wrong.

DRE: Oh really?

Patton: I’d send a track to Massive Attack and they were like, “huh.” It was a song that doesn’t really even resemble the one that came back to me, which is a good thing. With each tune I sent out a list of instructions basically like, “ok don’t touch this part. This part’s really weak. Maybe try this.” I wanted to give them enough direction but also enough space to do what they want and feel like they were involved in the music. In the case of Massive Attack, I sent them something that I thought they would like and they were like “hmm.” So they remixed it and redid it their way and I was excited by what came back.

DRE: Will there be a music video for Peeping Tom?

Patton: We’re going to do one. In fact, I already did my part. I should be seeing a rough cut any day now.

DRE: Who is the director?

Patton: The director is Matt McDermott and he’s an understudy of this friend of mine, Joseph Kahn. He has a lot of good ideas and is really enthusiastic. The video is very low budget. I did my part in few hours but I think it’ll be nice. It should be pretty funny.

suite plus bas...


Dernière édition par le Mar 30 Mai 2006 - 11:12, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.francobelgedesign.com
|BRAM|
Johnny Hallyday
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1770
Localisation : Tokyo
Date d'inscription : 23/06/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Mar 30 Mai 2006 - 11:08

Citation :
DRE: You used to do all these shows at The Knitting Factory and Tonic.

Patton: I still play those places. I think I played Tonic on New Year’s.

DRE: Oh really? Maybe they’re not publicizing this stuff enough.

Patton: Well, you know.

DRE: What do those small little shows do for you?

Patton: It depends. Most of those shows you’re talking about are either improv based or I’m guesting with someone else. If I’m going to go up there and make a big racket, I’d sure love to do it with somebody else. There’s still a lot to learn and I think that’s why I keep playing and working with different people.

DRE: Do you understand what you’re trying to do at this point or do you do the improv to see what it does for you?

Patton: Well, for instance on this Peeping Tom record, my goals are that I want to work with all these guys but also I want to learn how to program. I want to get something from this and I did get some pointers. I realized how little I do know about this and how skewed my approach really was. When you improvise with anyone, it’s an exchange of ideas that is instantaneous and you got to really think on your toes. It teaches you about composing instantly for the moment. I did a few shows at the Japanese Society a few days back with a bunch of Japanese improvisers, mostly vocalists.

DRE: That must have been fun.

Patton: Oh it was really a blast. Eye from The Boredoms was there and a few other people. Again you’re in a church, you’re up there just trying to fit in and I believe the closer you are to this stuff, even spending an hour with some of these cats, by osmosis you learn things. The way I learned music was by listening to records, watching movies, listening to the soundtracks and then also by doing. I think that the more input you have, the more output you have by default.

DRE: The great fantasy artist, Frank Frazetta, had a stroke a few years ago and is now unable to use his right hand, which he’s been drawing with for decades. He has had to learn how to draw using his left hand for the first time. Some of the pictures I’ve seen him do with his left hand are amazing. I know that you have a similar problem after destroying the nerves in your right hand, how are you doing with it?

Patton: Oh man, I didn’t know anybody knew about that. But it’s not that big of a deal. There was a period where it was a very big deal, where I had to learn how to do everything with my left hand. Play basketball, brush your teeth, masturbate, all that good stuff. In terms of writing, that’s changed a little bit, I still have the movement but the feeling is not there. I’m just so damn used to it now. But let’s just say I’ll be writing on guitar. I’ll be playing and playing and everything will be fine and then maybe I’m recording or something and all of a sudden it won’t be sounding quite right. I’ll look down and the pick will have fallen out of my hand and I’m playing with my fingers but it feels the same. So that’s a little example of how different that can be. You go, “oh shit. Whoops” and I put the pick back in my hand. But I wouldn’t say that it’s affected my writing in any other sense but physically. It’s hilarious because the doctors told me that I wouldn’t get the movement back but I’d get the feeling back. They were 100 percent wrong and I’m glad they were wrong because I’d rather be able to move the fucking thing.

DRE: I read that you just collaborated with a choir in Italy.

Patton: Yeah, I did. It wasn’t my piece, it was a piece by this composer Eyvind Kang from Seattle. We put one of his last records out on Ipecac, which was another classical piece. This one we did in Italy is a real ambitious piece. It has a 30 piece choir, brass quartet, couple guitars and then two soloists. I was one of the soloists. Again that was a learning experience because I never sang without a microphone before. We were in an opera house in Italy and I had to really project. I had to step up to the plate because these guys were all professional singers that had little tuning forks and were reading music and there I was flopping around on stage like a dead fish. [laughs] It was fun and I think it came out good. We did a recording that I can’t wait to hear.

DRE: Do you have any desire to write a choir piece now?

Patton: Not yet, but there’s a few little orchestral things on the horizon for me. A couple of things with Fantomas possibly and then also I’m arranging old Italian pop tunes. I think will be a good way to get my feet wet.

DRE: Is the movie you scored, Pinion, set to come out?

Patton: I haven’t even started composing yet because it got held up in production and it hasn’t started filming yet. It’s way on the backburner and I’m just waiting for them to call and say “hey, we’ve got a movie, start writing.”

DRE: How did you get involved with that?

Patton: The director [Melanie Lee] was a friend of a friend so they sent me a script which I liked so I met with her and that was it. But I think even if I hadn’t liked the script I would have probably tried it because I’m really curious about composing for film. It’s something I’ve always wanted to try and really never had many opportunities so I’m psyched to get going on it.

DRE: Do you know in advance what instruments you would use to score?

Patton: It depends on the script and what sounds I need. I started scoring a short film that I’m halfway done with. I’m behind of course and the instrumentation for that is all over the map. At times it sounds like I wrote a little fake aria for an opera. I wrote a 30’s swing piece and there’s another piece that’s maybe 30 seconds long that is perfectly timed to a scene where guys are in a car and flipping the dial on the radio. That’s like 30 genres in 30 seconds. The way I would approach it is the same way I do with any project. What do I want it to sound like? Then you write down a list of instruments and then you’ve got to find people to play them or play them yourself.

DRE: Do you have any desire to direct anything yourself?

Patton: Doubtful. I got enough problems.

DRE: I watched the trailer for Firecracker a couple days ago.

Patton: I don’t know if I’ve seen that trailer. How is it?

DRE: It looks really wild.

Patton: It’s pretty wild looking. The script is all over the place and the acting, present company included, is a little spotty. But man it looks great. I’ve only seen it in its entirety once and it’s quite a rollercoaster ride. It is half black and white, half color. It jumps off the screen, it’s really beautiful.

DRE: Do you want to do more acting?

Patton: We’ll see. The reason I did that is because the situation was so incredibly perfect. It was a combination of coincidences that it made it impossible for me to say no. I knew the director, the script was good, a few people in the movie were really working me about it and I had free time. It was just like, “Damn, should I really try this? Yeah, why not? What have I got to lose?” It won’t be the first time I look like an idiot in front of a lot of people.

DRE: What do you know about SuicideGirls?

Patton: It’s funny because I’ve never been to the site. All I really know about SuicideGirls is that every time we play Portland or Seattle, there are a few really obnoxious punk rock girls that come backstage yelling that they are SuicideGirls and they want to drink all our beer. That’s pretty much my experience right there.
http://suicidegirls.com/words/Mike+Patton/
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.francobelgedesign.com
xspirit
Firecracker
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2128
Age : 109
Localisation : Riorges. capitale de la scie musicale...
Date d'inscription : 05/04/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Mar 30 Mai 2006 - 13:38

DRE avait déjà fait une ITV de Mike
http://domaincleveland.com/index.php?pid=interviews&aid=57

Je sais plus si on l'avait déjà posté

Citation :
Dougless caught up with Mike Patton to get his views on the Cavs and Lakers, his starring role in Steve Balderson’s film Firecracker and the self-titled debut release from Peeping Tom.

Dougless R. Esper: So the Lakers are looking good this spring. How far do you think they will go? And will you be mad if they lose to The Cavaliers in the finals?

Mike Patton: No offense, but the Cavs are not even on my radar. We got a lot to do to get there, as do the Cavs. The Pistons are going to be impossible to beat in the east. We are finally gelling, but I don't see how we would be able to beat the Spurs if we meet them. You never know though. NBA is FANtastic.

D.R.E.: In Firecracker, you were originally cast as a henchman. How did you end up playing two main characters in the film?

M.P.: I believe Dennis Hopper dropped out, believe it or not.

D.R.E.: Did you ever take the mortician at his offer and sneak in to see some dead bodies while in Kansas?

M.P.: Of course! What else you going to do in Kansas? I met some very interesting people.

D.R.E.: Steve Balderson said of your acting that "Patton is willing to just be vulnerable onstage and just let it loose, while still maintaining control so his voice and his being is doing what he planned, that makes an awesome actor." How did you prepare for your roles and how do you feel you did on set?

M.P.: I listened to Steve as much as I could and the other actors as well. I tried to get as far from being me as I could. Focus can be difficult. I think I did ok. I'm not giving up my day job!

D.R.E.: You had been offered several roles in other projects before this. What made this the right one for you to try?

M.P.: It was a bizarre story, bizarre parts and the timing was right in my schedule. Plus Steve is very persuasive!

D.R.E.: Will you act again?

M.P.: I hope so! It is out of my hands to some degree.

D.R.E.: How was Steve Balderson as a director? What was his style/demeanor on set?

M.P.: He was great. Always in control, yet not overbearing. I would hate to work with a director that does not listen to the actors. Don't get me wrong, this was Steve's baby, but he really helps and supports the actors.

D.R.E.: In May you are set to release the self-titled debut disc from Peeping Tom. How good will it feel to have it out after such a long period of working on it?

M.P.: A relief! Of course, then I have to put the touring band together. We are playing the Conan show on May 26th, so I have a deadline. This project has been a struggle at times, but well worth the sweat. I'll be happy to buy a copy of it at a record store! We just did a great video for the song "Mojo" with some cool cameos in it.

D.R.E.: There are several guests on this album. Will it be possible to tour as Peeping Tom?

M.P.: Oh yeah. I'll be hitting the road this fall at latest. Anything is possible.

D.R.E.: Looking back on Ipecac, what surprises you about the catalogue you have released? And looking ahead what are you looking forward to releasing?

M.P.: The surprise is that we have been as successful as we have been without compromising our original vision. It has been an adventure, but a fun one. We have put out a lot of very interesting records and worked with some great people. I look forward to all of our releases including new records from the Melvins, Isis, Dälek, Mugison, Kaada etc etc. Get 'em all at www.ipecac.com.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.sciemusicale.fr
jediroller
Suspended Animation
avatar

Nombre de messages : 388
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Mar 30 Mai 2006 - 15:18

(NB : repostée dans le bon topic, désolé...)


Caca Volante nous apprend que Patton fait l'objet d'un
article de Reuters (daté du 25 mai) à l'occasion de la sortie de Peeping Tom.

J'ai bricolé une traduction rapide pour les allergiques à la langue de George Bush, des fois qu'il y en aurait.


Citation :
L'ex-chanteur de Faith No More redécouvre la mélodie

L'ancien leader de Faith No More, Mike Patton, habitué des couinements, hurlements et imitations de personnages de dessins animés, revient à un style de chant plus traditionnel.

Huit ans après la séparation du groupe pionnier, propulsé au premier plan dans les années 80 avec l'hymne rap-rock "Epic", le chanteur a finalement mis de côté ses projets musicaux avant-gardistes, cinématographiques, voire noise-rock bizarre, pour publier "Peeping Tom", un disque mélodique qui mêle hip-hop et rock alternatif.

"C'est plus basé sur les chansons. J'avais besoin d'un peu d'équilibre", explique Patton à Reuters. "J'avais beaucoup d'idées pour des chansons mélodiques et aucun projet dans lequel les utiliser. Je traverse des phases, et en ce moment c'est la saison de Peeping Tom."

L'album est construit sur des rythmes trip-hop et des samples, et doit beaucoup aux performances vocales de Patton. Les fans de FNM qui rêvent d'une improbable réunion percevront des échos de l'ancien Patton, dans son murmure menaçant sur le single "Mojo" ou dans son crescendo sur le dernier titre, "We're Not Alone".

L'album, qui a pris six ans de travail, réunit une palette de collaborateurs tels que le groupe de trip-hop britannique Massive Attack, le rapper Kool Keith, le "human beatbox" Rhazel et la chanteuse Norah Jones, lauréate d'un Grammy Award. Ils ont échangé des fichiers par courrier avec Patton, qui n'a encore jamais rencontré ni Jones ni Keith en personne.

"Je m'étais préparé à un gros cauchemar bien dramatique, vu la réputation qu'a Keith d'être un collaborateur extrêmement difficile", raconte Patton. "On sait tous qu'il est un peu dingue. Je ne m'attendais pas à récupérer ce morceau, mais je suis un grand fan de ce qu'il fait et je m'étais préparé à faire tout ce qu'il faudrait pour que ça marche."

"Je n'aurais pas pu me tromper plus ! Il a été un des collaborateurs les plus responsables et les plus professionnels avec lesquels j'ai travaillé. Je lui ai parlé une fois au téléphone et trois jours après, j'ai reçu le morceau et il était parfait."

Patton, qui écrivit pour Faith No More des chansons telles que "Crack Hitler" et "Cuckoo For Caca", ne faillit pas à sa réputation : ses paroles sont truffées d'humour irrévérent et de bizarreries, avec des passages comme "I know that assholes grow on trees/But I'm here to trim the leaves" ("Je sais que les connards poussent sur les arbres / Mais je suis là pour couper les feuilles"), extrait de "Don't Even Trip".

Il parvient à faire proférer à Norah Jones des grossièretés inédites dans sa bouche, sur la chanson "Sucker", dans laquelle elle chuchote lascivement : ""What makes you think you're my only lover/The truth kinda hurts, don't it, motherfucker?" ("Qu'est-ce qui te fait croire que tu es mon seul amant / La vérité blesse, pas vrai, enculé ?")

"Je ne me considère pas comme un grand parolier", dit Patton. "J'ai essayé de trouver des mots qui me sonnaient bien et qui coulaient bien, puis j'ai assemblé un petit thème. Je voulais que les paroles restent légères et marrantes, en accord avec la musique, que je trouve légère et marrante, qui fait penser aux vacances."

Le chanteur avoue qu'il lui arrive de penser au bon vieux temps de FNM, quand ils faisaient la tournée des stades avec Metallica et Guns N' Roses, mais sans regret.

"Ils sont bons parce qu'ils n'existent plus", dit-il. "S'ils étaient encore ensemble, ça irait mal aujourd'hui. C'a été vraiment dur de cracher le dernier album ("Album of the Year"). Je crois qu'il tient la comparaison avec les autres, mais je regardais dans la boule de cristal et je voyais dans quelle direction on allait. La meilleure chose à faire était de terminer sur une note positive."

Bien qu'on le lui propose parfois, Patton affirme qu'il ne sera jamais d'accord pour reformer Faith No More.

"Tous les 4 ou 5 ans, une espèce de Svengali qui croit pouvoir changer le monde arrive avec une valise pleine de fric et fait une offre dingue", dit-il. "Et ce n'est pas facile (de refuser). Ce serait très facile pour certains d'entre nous de répéter pendant quelques jours, de sourire et d'encaisser le chèque. Je n'en suis pas là. Je suis suffisamment occupé. Peut-être s'il venait avec deux valises pleines de fric..."
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
EpiC---
Angel Dust
avatar

Nombre de messages : 90
Date d'inscription : 07/08/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Mer 31 Mai 2006 - 16:46

"Tous les 4 ou 5 ans, une espèce de Svengali qui croit pouvoir changer le monde arrive avec une valise pleine de fric et fait une offre dingue", dit-il. "Et ce n'est pas facile (de refuser). Ce serait très facile pour certains d'entre nous de répéter pendant quelques jours, de sourire et d'encaisser le chèque. Je n'en suis pas là. Je suis suffisamment occupé. Peut-être s'il venait avec deux valises pleines de fric..."



Qu'on apporte une deuxième valise dwarf cheers
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
fafa patton
Angel Dust
avatar

Nombre de messages : 38
Localisation : aquitaine
Date d'inscription : 12/03/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Mer 31 Mai 2006 - 20:46

[FnM] a écrit:
Qu'on apporte une deuxième valise dwarf cheers
j'avais entendu parler il ya 2 ans je crois qu'on lui avait proposer d'etre le chanteur de INXS c'est vrai? Surprised
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
jediroller
Suspended Animation
avatar

Nombre de messages : 388
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Mer 31 Mai 2006 - 21:09

Une VF de l'interview de SuicideGirls ça vous dit ?

Citation :

Il y a plusieurs années, au cours d'une interview, on m'a demandé s'il y avait quelqu'un que j'avais vraiment envie d'interviewer sans en avoir encore eu l'occasion. Depuis, j'ai parlé à la plupart des gens que j'avais cités, tels que Frank Miller, James O'Barr et Darren Aronofsky. Le moment est venu de barrer un autre nom de la liste, quelqu'un que j'espérais rencontrer depuis 15 ans : Mike Patton. Comme la plupart des fans de Patton, je l'ai découvert quand il était le chanteur de Faith No More. Plus tard, on m'a fait écouter le premier album de Mr. Bungle et la deuxième moitié des années 90 a été un véritable paradis pattonien, avec ses albums solo d'avant-garde et la création des groupes Tomahawk et Fantômas.

Le dernier projet en date de Patton est le premier album de Peeping Tom, publié par son label Ipecac. Patton l'a enregistré avec ses collaborateurs réguliers Dan the Automator, Rahzel et Massive Attack, ainsi qu'avec de nouvelles têtes comme Norah Jones et Kool Keith.


Daniel Robert Epstein : D'après votre dossier de presse, l'album de Peeping Tom est plus accessible.

Mike Patton : En gros, je fais les fichus disques et dans une certaines mesure j'en parle après leur sortie si on m'y force. Après ça, ce qui se dit dans les biographies, je ne m'en occupe pas parce que, mon Dieu, je ne sais pas comment décrire ce truc ou ce qui va faire bien dans un dossier de presse. Donc je laisse d'autres s'occuper de ça et je me retrouve parfois obligé d'argumenter pour y échapper. Mais qui sait ? Accessible ? Je suis d'accord pour dire qu'il est plus facile à écouter. C'est de la musique plus linéaire que dans beaucoup d'autres de mes projets actuels, et c'est plus basé sur les chansons. Pour le reste, je n'en ai pas la moindre idée et je vous laisse décider.

DRE : Quand vous avez commencé à travailler sur Peeping Tom, ça n'avait pas l'air aussi ambitieux que d'autres projets que vous aviez à l'époque.

Patton : C'est possible. Il a traîné sur mon bureau pendant un moment. Je travaillais dessus pendant mon temps libre. Mais c'est comme ça que tous mes projets commencent, je ne hiérarchise pas vraiment. Ca dépend seulement de mon humeur : si j'ai l'impression que c'est le moment de travailler sur Tomahawk, ou sur Fantômas, ça devient mon projet principal et le reste passe au second plan. On ne peut pas se concentrer sur trop de choses à la fois. Malheureusement, celui-ci était constamment écarté au profit d'autre chose, même si dans ma tête c'était un truc que j'avais vraiment très envie de faire. Mais il a un peu pris la poussière.

DRE : Le fait que Peeping Tom soit finalement beaucoup plus accessible est-il venu naturellement ?

Patton : Ouais, ma méthode d'écriture, en résumé, c'est que je m'assieds simplement devant le bureau et que je commence à écrire. C'est ce processus que j'adore, et puis tout à coup une lumière s'éteint et c'est fini. J'ai su tout de suite que ces chansons n'allaient pouvoir s'intégrer dans aucun de mes autres projets. Une fois que j'ai eu 10 ou 15 morceaux que je trouvais vraiment bons, je me suis dit "OK, je suppose qu'il va falloir en faire quelque chose." Ce qui, dans mon cas, signifie créer un nouveau groupe, commencer un nouveau projet. Il y a encore des territoires stylistiques que je veux explorer et il faut que je le fasse. C'est à ce moment-là que j'ai commencé à le prendre plus au sérieux et à le mettre sur le même plan que mes autres projets. Après ça, j'ai pu dégager du temps et me concentrer dessus.

DRE : Comment savez-vous quand une de vos chansons est terminée ?

Patton : C'est difficile, et la meilleure réponse est... on le sait, c'est tout. [Rires.] Plus je vieillis, plus je deviens conscient de ça. Je me suis rendu compte que l'une de mes faiblesses en tant qu'auteur, c'est de savoir quand m'arrêter, quel que soit le style du morceau que je suis en train d'écrire, que ce soit une pièce étrange et théâtrale, un air de groove ou un long collage avant-gardiste. Le truc, c'est de savoir s'arrêter. L'une de mes faiblesses c'est vraiment d'en faire trop, de sur-orchestrer. Avec ce projet, le défi était de reprendre tout ce que j'avais appris et expérimenté ces dernières années et de le faire tenir dans une chanson de trois minutes qui ne parte pas dans tous les sens. Qu'elle soit guidée par la mélodie et qu'elle vous tienne en haleine sans devenir trop ennuyeuse ou trop linéaire. Pour moi, c'était un équilibre vraiment délicat et un vrai défi à réaliser.

à suivre...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
jediroller
Suspended Animation
avatar

Nombre de messages : 388
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Mer 31 Mai 2006 - 21:11

part two...

Citation :

DRE : Qu'est-ce qui fait d'une chanson de Peeping Tom une chanson de Peeping Tom et d'une chanson de Tomahawk une chanson de Tomahawk ?

Patton : Chacune d'elles est pour moi un petit univers à part entière. Chacune a son propre petit ensemble de règles, de lois et de paramètres. La seule façon dont je puisse rendre ma musique compréhensible est de compartimenter, plutôt que d'avoir un seul groupe dans lequel je balancerais tout. Pour moi c'est simplement plus amusant et plus stimulant de créer des petits univers dans lesquels une chanson ou un morceau a un sens. Avec Fantômas, par exemple, le langage que nous avons élaboré et que j'avais à l'esprit au départ était, "OK, je vais utiliser ces trucs que j'écoutais quand j'étais gamin, comme le heavy metal, les riffs hardcore, des trucs qu'on a déjà entendus. Mais je vais les organiser d'une façon vraiment inhabituelle et déroutante. Je ne vais pas en faire des chansons. Il n'y aura pas de paroles. Je ne serai pas un chanteur au sens traditionnel. Ma voix sera comme une deuxième guitare." Donc, voilà les règles de base. On peut faire beaucoup de choses à l'intérieur de ce cadre. On a déjà fait trois, quatre albums ; on en fera sans doute trois ou quatre autres.

Une fois que je me suis lancé dans Peeping Tom, j'ai compris ce qu'était ce projet et ce qu'il fallait qu'il devienne. Souvent on comprend au fur et à mesure, comme dans la vie. Plus on vit longtemps et plus les choses deviennent claires. Avec Peeping Tom, comme je l'ai dit, j'ai compris que je voulais rester dans un format de chanson assez classique, et cela élimine automatiquement tout un tas de variations. Tomahawk, c'est complètement différent, c'est un autre univers. C'est plus un groupe de rock traditionnel, mais tout commence avec Duane Denison, le guitariste. C'est son bébé, c'est lui qui écrit les chansons. Mon rôle est très différent dans ce contexte. Je suis le facilitateur, je l'aide à étoffer ses mélodies et à faire des arrangements. Que ce soit voulu dès le départ ou pas, chaque projet devient son propre petit monde, dans lequel certaines choses peuvent arriver et d'autres sont impossibles.

DRE : le film "Peeping Tom" est un de mes préférés. Il y a cette réplique géniale : "All this filming. It's not healthy" ("Tout ce filmage. Ce n'est pas sain").

Patton : Ouais, on m'a dit que vous étiez cinéphile et que vous connaissiez des répliques de ce film.

DRE : J'adore ce film [rires].

Patton : Un homme de goût.

DRE : Avez-vous jamais pensé que ce que vous faites... "malsain" n'est peut-être pas le mot juste, mais certains pourraient considérer votre musique comme malsaine.


Patton : Eh bien, tant pis. Il y a du danger dans tout ce qui est inhabituel. C'est le monde dans lequel nous vivons. Les gens veulent être rassurés, ils veulent qu'on leur dise des choses qu'ils savent déjà. On nous abreuve d'images et on nous dit quoi aimer et ce qui est bon, et je crois que la plupart des gens sont contents comme ça. Il faut faire un gros effort pour penser autrement. Partout où vous allez il y a quelqu'un pour penser à votre place et vous dire quoi penser et quand y penser. Donc, même si ce disque de Peeping Tom sonne classique à mes oreilles, dans mon univers c'est de la pop music, c'est du groove, quel que soit le nom que vous souhaitez lui donner. C'est ma musique soul romantique, merde ! Comment ça se traduit dans le monde réel, c'est quelque chose qui m'échappe complètement. Je suis conscient que ça ne ressemble pas à Kylie Minogue ou aux Strokes, et je me rends compte que tout ce que je fais sera toujours un peu bâtard et que ça ne rentrera pas dans les cases. Mais je crois que de bonnes choses existent hors de ces cases et que c'est notre responsabilité, ou au moins la mienne, de trouver ces choses. C'est en partie pour ça que j'ai créé un label, pour fournir un toit à quelques inadaptés musicaux.

DRE : Y a-t-il beaucoup d'improvisation sur cet album ?

Patton : Non, pas vraiment. L'enregistrement a été un peu bizarre. En fait c'était très perso et solitaire. C'était surtout moi. Je croyais au départ que, comme dans beaucoup de mes projets, je jouerais sur des instruments pour pouvoir communiquer ce que je voulais aux autres musiciens. J'enregistre des démos chez moi et ils apprennent le morceau à partir de ça, vu que je n'écris pas la musique. C'est comme ça que je procède. C'est ce que j'ai fait pour Fantômas et beaucoup d'autres projets. Je me suis habitué à la facilité, au côté bricolo de cette méthode et je me suis rendu compte que je n'aurais pas besoin d'engager quelqu'un. Mais la principale faiblesse résidait dans la programmation, parce que là je suis carrément nul. Là je me suis dit, plutôt que de coller un groupe dans un studio et d'essayer de recréer ça, je vais garder ces morceaux et bosser avec des producteurs, des créateurs de rythmes. C'est un truc que je n'avais jamais vraiment fait. Et puis peut-être un invité ou deux. C'est comme ça que c'est venu. Et puisque c'était comme ça que se projet allait se faire, je n'allais plus me détourner de ce chemin-là, quel que soit le temps que ça prenne, parce que s'il y a une chose dont on a besoin pour bosser à distance avec 15 personnes différentes, c'est bien de patience.

...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
jediroller
Suspended Animation
avatar

Nombre de messages : 388
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Mer 31 Mai 2006 - 21:12

Part trois...

Citation :

DRE : j'ai lu que l'idée de faire participer Norah Jones à l'album vous est venue pendant une conversation autour d'un verre...

Patton : Ouais, ce n'était pas gagné d'avance, mais j'ai pris contact et elle a répondu immédiatement. Je dirais que j'ai eu une chance incroyable. Certains des autres participants, comme Dan the Automator et Rahzel, sont une espèce d'assurance. Chaque fois que je commence un nouveau truc, il me faut quelques têtes connues. Je sais que j'obtiendrai quelque chose de bon de leur part et leur présence peut inciter d'autres gens à s'intéresser au projet. Au-delà de ça, il y a des gens que je connaissais un peu et d'autres qui étaient de parfaits étrangers. Je procède chanson par chanson, je me dis "Ce rythme, cette approche conviendrait parfaitement à Amon Tobin, ou à Massive Attack, etc." Dans de nombreux cas, je me gourais complètement.

DRE : Vraiment ?

Patton : J'ai envoyé un morceau à Massive Attack et leur réaction a été du genre "Heu...". La chanson ne ressemblait en rien à ce qu'il m'ont renvoyé, ce qui est une bonne chose. Avec chaque morceau, j'envoyais aussi une liste d'instructions du style "Ne touchez pas à ce passage. Ce passage est vraiment faible, vous pouvez peut-être essayer comme ça..." Je voulais les diriger mais aussi leur laisser de l'espace pour s'exprimer et qu'ils se sentent impliqués dans cette musique. Dans le cas de Massive Attack, je leur ai envoyé un truc dont je croyais qu'il pourrait leur plaire et ils ont été plutôt tièdes. Alors ils l'ont remixé et ils l'ont refait à leur manière, et j'étais très excité quand ils me l'ont renvoyé.

DRE : Est-ce qu'il y aura une vidéo de Peeping Tom ?

Patton : Nous allons en faire une. En fait, j'ai déjà tourné ma part. On devrait me montrer un premier montage dans les prochains jours.

DRE : Qui réalise ?

Patton : Matt McDermott, un élève de mon ami Joseph Kahn. Il a beaucoup de bonnes idées et il est très enthousiaste. C'est une vidéo à très petit budget. Ca ne m'a pris que quelques heures pour tourner ma prestation, mais je crois que ce sera bon. Ca devrait être très marrant.

DRE : Vous aviez l'habitude de jouer souvent à la Knitting Factory et au Tonic.

Patton : J'y joue toujours. Je crois bien avoir joué au Tonic pour le nouvel an.

DRE : Vraiment ? Ils ne font peut-être pas assez de pub.

Patton : Ouais, bon, vous savez...

DRE : Ca vous apporte quoi ces tout petits concerts ?

Patton : Ca dépend. La plupart du temps, soit ces concerts sont fondés sur l'impro, soit je partage la scène avec un autre artiste. Si je décide d'aller là-bas pour faire du boucan, je préfère encore le faire avec quelqu'un d'autre. J'ai encore beaucoup à apprendre et je pense que c'est pour ça que je continue de travailler avec des gens différents.

DRE : Est-ce que vous avez une vision claire de ce que vous voulez faire aujourd'hui, ou est-ce que vous faites de l'impro pour voir où ça peut vous mener ?

Patton : Eh bien, par exemple sur l'album de Peeping Tom, mes objectifs étaient de bosser avec tous ces gens mais aussi d'apprendre à programmer. Je veux en tirer quelque chose et j'ai déjà un peu progressé. Je me suis rendu compte à quel point j'étais ignorant dans ce domaine et à quel point mon approche était erronée. Quand on improvise avec quelqu'un, c'est un échange d'idées instantané et il faut vraiment réagir rapidement. Ca vous apprend à composer instantanément, sur le moment.

J'ai fait quelques concerts à la Japanese Society il y a quelques jours avec une poignée d'improvisateurs japonais, principalement des vocalistes.

DRE : Ca devait être sympa.

Patton : Oh, je me suis éclaté. [Yamataka] Eye, des Boredoms, était là avec quelques autres. Quand on est dans une église, on essaye de s'intégrer au groupe, et je crois que plus on est proche de ce truc, même si on ne passe que quelques heures avec ces gars-là, on apprend par osmose. C'est comme ça que j'ai appris la musique, en écoutant des disques, en regardant des films, en écoutant les bandes originales et puis aussi en jouant. Je crois que plus on absorbe de choses, plus on peut en créer aussi.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
jediroller
Suspended Animation
avatar

Nombre de messages : 388
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Mer 31 Mai 2006 - 21:13

suite de la suite de la suite...

Citation :

DRE : Le grand illustrateur d'heroic fantasy Frank Frazetta a eu une attaque il y a quelques années. Depuis, il est incapable d'utiliser sa main droite, avec laquelle il a dessiné pendant des décennies. Il a été obligé d'apprendre à se servir de sa main gauche. Je l'ai vu dessiner de la main gauche et le résultat était extraordinaire. Je sais que vous avez eu le même problème après la destruction des nerfs de votre main droite. Comment vous en sortez-vous ?

Patton : Ca alors, je ne savais pas que quelqu'un était au courant ! Ce n'est pas si grave. Il y a eu une période pendant laquelle ça m'a vraiment emmerdé, quand j'ai dû réapprendre à tout faire avec ma main gauche. Jouer au basket, se brosser les dents, se masturber, tous les bons trucs. Pour ce qui est de composer, ça a un petit peu changé, j'ai toujours le mouvement mais la sensation a disparu. Je suis juste habitué maintenant. Mais disons que je compose à la guitare. Je joue et tout se passe bien, puis j'enregistre ou je ne sais quoi et tout à coup ça ne sonne plus tout à fait juste. Je baisse les yeux et je me rends compte que j'ai lâché le médiator et que je joue avec mes doigts, mais la sensation est la même. C'est un petit exemple de ce que ça a pu changer. Je me dis "Oh merde" et je replace le médiator entre mes doigts. Mais en dehors de l'aspect physique, je ne dirais pas que ça ait affecté ma façon de composer. Ce qui est vraiment marrant, c'est que les docteurs m'avaient dit que je ne récupérerais pas le mouvement mais que la sensation reviendrait. Ils se sont plantés à 100 % et je préfère ça, parce que je préfère quand même être capable de bouger ma foutue main.

DRE : J'ai lu que vous veniez de travailler avec un choeur en Italie.

Patton : C'est vrai. Je n'ai pas écrit la musique, elle est d'Eyvind Kang, un compositeur de Seattle. On a sorti un de ses derniers disques sur Ipecac, c'était déjà des pièces classiques. Le morceau qu'on a enregistré en Italie est vraiment ambitieux. Il y a un choeur de 30 personnes, un quatuor de cuivres, une paire de guitares et deux solistes, dont moi. Là encore j'ai beaucoup appris, je n'avais encore jamais chanté sans micro. On était dans un opéra en Italie et je devais vraiment projeter ma voix. Il fallait que je montre de quoi j'étais capable, parce tous les autres étaient des chanteurs professionnels qui se baladaient avec des petits diapasons, qui lisaient la musique... et moi j'étais là à me tortiller sur scène comme un poisson mort [rires]. C'était sympa et je pense que le résultat sera bon. Je suis impatient d'entendre ce qu'on a enregistré.

DRE : Vous auriez envie d'écrire pour un choeur après ça ?

Patton : Pas encore, mais il y a quelques petits trucs avec orchestre dans mes projets. Peut-être un ou deux trucs avec Fantômas, et puis je travaille aussi sur des arrangements de vieilles chansons pop italiennes. Je crois que ça sera un bon apprentissage.

DRE : Savez-vous quand doit sortir "Pinion", le film dont vous avez écrit la musique ?

Patton : Je n'ai même pas encore commencé à composer, parce que le film a été bloqué au stade de la production et que le tournage n'a pas encore débuté. C'est en stand-by pour l'instant, j'attends qu'ils m'appellent et me disent "Hé, on a un film, tu peux commencer à composer."

DRE : Comment vous êtes-vous retrouvé à travailler là-dessus ?

Patton : La réalisatrice [Melanie Lee] est l'amie d'un ami. Ils m'ont envoyé un scénario, je l'ai bien aimé, et voilà. Mais même si je n'avais pas aimé le script, je crois que j'aurais probablement tenté ma chance, parce que la musique de film est vraiment quelque chose qui m'attire. J'ai toujours voulu essayer et je n'en ai jamais vraiment eu l'occasion, alors je suis vraiment impatient de m'y mettre.

DRE : Savez-vous à l'avance quels instruments vous allez utiliser ?

Patton : Ca dépend du scénario et des sons dont j'aurai besoin. J'ai commencé à composer pour un court-métrage, j'en suis à la moitié. Je suis à la bourre, évidemment, et les arrangements partent dans tous les sens. Par moments ça donne l'impression d'une petite pseudo-aria d'opéra. J'ai écrit un morceau de swing dans le style des années 30 et un autre d'environ 30 secondes qui est chronométré pour coller parfaitement à une scène dans laquelle des types sont dans une voiture, allument la radio et se baladent sur les fréquences. Ca fait environ 30 genres musicaux en 30 secondes. Mon approche est la même que pour n'importe quel autre projet : Comment est-ce que je veux que ça sonne ? Après ça j'écris une liste d'instruments, et puis je dois trouver des musiciens pour jouer, ou tout jouer moi-même.

DRE : Vous-même, ça vous tenterait de réaliser un film ?

Patton : Peu probable. J'ai assez de problèmes.

DRE : J'ai vu la bande annonce de Firecracker récemment.

Patton : Je ne suis pas sûr de l'avoir vue. Elle est comment ?

DRE : Ca a l'air vraiment dingue.

Patton : C'est un film assez dingue. Le scénario part dans tous les sens et les acteurs, y compris votre serviteur, sont un peu légers. Mais ça a vraiment de la gueule ! Je ne l'ai vu en entier qu'une seule fois et c'est un vrai grand 8. Il est à moitié en noir et blanc et à moitié en couleur. Il vous saute à la figure, il est vraiment superbe.

DRE : Vous avez envie de continuer à faire l'acteur ?

Patton. Voyons... Si j'ai fait ça c'est parce que la situation était absolument parfaite. Une succession de coïncidences a fait qu'il était impossible pour moi de refuser. Je connaissais le réalisateur, le scénario était bon, une partie des gens qui participaient au film m'ont vraiment harcelé pour que je le fasse, et j'avais du temps libre. C'était simplement une situation où je me suis dit "Merde alors, est-ce que je devrais essayer de faire ce truc pour voir ? Ouais, pourquoi pas ? Qu'est-ce que j'ai à perdre ?" Ce ne serait pas la première fois que j'aurais l'air d'un idiot devant plein de gens.

DRE : Vous connaissez SuicideGirls ?

Patton : C'est marrant, je ne suis jamais venu sur ce site. Tout ce que j'en sais, c'est que chaque fois qu'on joue à Portland ou à Seattle, il y a toujours une bande de punkettes mal embouchées qui débarquent dans les coulisses en gueulant qu'elle sont des "SuicideGirls" et qu'elle vont boire toute notre bière. Voilà, c'est toute mon expérience avec SG. (FIN)


Dernière édition par le Mer 31 Mai 2006 - 21:52, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
1930
Gros Calibre
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1521
Date d'inscription : 10/03/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Mer 31 Mai 2006 - 21:19

Merci pour les trad. c'est vraiment sympa ! thumright
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
xspirit
Firecracker
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2128
Age : 109
Localisation : Riorges. capitale de la scie musicale...
Date d'inscription : 05/04/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Mer 31 Mai 2006 - 21:26

Après une semaine avec Chadburbe Laughing , tu sais toujours pas parler briton ?
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.sciemusicale.fr
1930
Gros Calibre
avatar

Nombre de messages : 1521
Date d'inscription : 10/03/2005

MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   Mer 31 Mai 2006 - 21:28

Pas envie de me prendre la tête alors qu'il est possible de rien branler.. Mr. Green
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Interviews   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Interviews
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 2 sur 5Aller à la page : Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Suivant
 Sujets similaires
-
» Elusive Shadow vous propose: traduction de diverses interviews, discours... Du King Of Pop!
» Au fil des interviews
» Interviews de SATYRICON par Gwenn
» Jean-françois Zygel
» [Interview] Bill Kaulitz pour Stern magazine

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Welcome to the Wonderful World of... Mike Patton :: GENERAL (PATTON) :: Loser On Line-
Sauter vers: